ARC 519a: ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO
with Francesco Mangado and Cristina Chu (Fall 2008)

"Linear City" (Gandia, Spain)

This project began with the investigation of the extant city fabric, focusing on the difference between the centripetal growth of the historic center and the linear expansion of the new town. The initial proposal recognized this disjunction and sought to stitch the two fabrics together by cutting across the grain of the new town and making a literal connection between old and new in the form of an elevated walkway/bike path.

Upon further investigation, it seems more potent to accentuate the linear grain of the new town – that is to say, rather than trying to disrupt the directionality of the new town, it seems more compelling to use the urban diagnosis to resolve the issue at hand. Moreover, this approach evolves from the desire to create a second buffer of public activity for the linear city, opposite the beach front. As such, the hotel and its attendant programs are seen as the point of friction between the new Marsh Park, to be developed next to the protected marshlands, and the existing alameda. The hotel, then, must resolve the linear tensions between park and plaza, acting as both a hard edge and a porous boundary.

ARC 519a: ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO
with Francesco Mangado and Cristina Chu (Fall 2008)

"Linear City" (Gandia, Spain)

This project began with the investigation of the extant city fabric, focusing on the difference between the centripetal growth of the historic center and the linear expansion of the new town. The initial proposal recognized this disjunction and sought to stitch the two fabrics together by cutting across the grain of the new town and making a literal connection between old and new in the form of an elevated walkway/bike path.

Upon further investigation, it seems more potent to accentuate the linear grain of the new town – that is to say, rather than trying to disrupt the directionality of the new town, it seems more compelling to use the urban diagnosis to resolve the issue at hand. Moreover, this approach evolves from the desire to create a second buffer of public activity for the linear city, opposite the beach front. As such, the hotel and its attendant programs are seen as the point of friction between the new Marsh Park, to be developed next to the protected marshlands, and the existing alameda. The hotel, then, must resolve the linear tensions between park and plaza, acting as both a hard edge and a porous boundary.